KNIT THIS SNOOD; GET WARM AND FUZZY

FROM THE ARCHIVES
As it’s getting colder (well, here it is – damn you Aussies and your beachy Instagram pics!), we thought we’d repost this to keep you cosy…

Let’s face it, Londoners: it’s still cold. And it’ll probably be cold for a long, long time.

What you need right now is a snood – a homemade snood. Because A) it’ll keep you nice and toasty when it’s bitter outside, and B) you can justify spending an entire day – or a couple of nights – at home while working on your project (“sorry, I really would love to drag myself away from my hot water bottle and come out, but I’ve scheduled a crafternoon”).

Besides, this snood is so easy to make, you can do it while hanging out on the sofa indulging in a Game of Thrones marathon – and probably finish it before the death toll hits the first hundred!

I use moss stitch (also known as seed stitch), as it looks as if you’ve done something fancy with not much effort; plus, the pattern and texture hide all manner of sins. It’s dead simple: cast on an odd number of stitches, and knit 1, purl 1. Novice knitter? You can handle that.

KNIT THIS SNOOD; GET WARM AND FUZZY

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  • 2 balls of chunky wool (I used this, which is a bit of a splurge, but who can resist the name ‘Gray Wolf’?; Rowan Big Wool is also good for this project.
  • A set of 8mm circular knitting needles with a 35cm cable – this saves you sewing a seam. Knitting with circular needles makes you look as if you know what you’re doing! You can, of course, use regular needles; see instructions at the end for how it’s done.
  • Scissors
  • Wool needle (with a really large eye to accommodate chunky wool)

KNIT THIS SNOOD; GET WARM AND FUZZY

1. Cast on 51 stitches. You can do more or less, depending on how loose you want your snood; just make sure it’s an odd number. If you want, place a stitch marker on the right needle, but leaving a ‘tail’ of wool when you cast on will just as easily help you keep track of your starting point.

KNIT THIS SNOOD; GET WARM AND FUZZY

2. To ‘knit in the round’ and create a tube, start by making sure none of the stitches are twisted. Knit your first stitch, pulling the wool tight so it meets the stitches on the other end of the needle with a snug fit. Purl the next stitch.

KNIT THIS SNOOD; GET WARM AND FUZZY

3. K1, P1 (that’s code for knit 1 stitch, purl 1 stitch) until you’re almost out of wool – make sure you have enough left to cast off! My snood is 22cm high – the longer you make it, the scrunchier your snood. And before you cast off, make sure you’re back at your starting point in the loop. If you haven’t used a stitch marker, use the tail from your first row as a reference point.

KNIT THIS SNOOD; GET WARM AND FUZZY

4. Cast off and use your wool needle to weave in the ends.

For the folks using regular needles:
If you don’t have a set of circular needles, cast on 51 stitches and work in K1, P1 until you reach your desired height. Leave enough wool to cast off and stitch the ends together. Use your wool needle to join the short ends and form a tube. Weave in the ends, and you have a snood!

Easy peasy, right?

Photography & styling: Selina Altomonte

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