MAKE A BABY BIB FROM SCRAPS – CATCH SPEW WITH STYLE

Are you in the middle of a baby boom? Maybe babies are popping out all around you or you are about to have one yourself? And the weekend getaway you have been trying to save for seems eternally out of reach because of all the baby paraphernalia you’ve been purchasing…

Well, here’s a really easy tutorial on how to make some fancy bibs. It won’t cost much, you could possibly spend an afternoon making them in bulk and this would make a great present – every baby needs a bib!

Of course, you could also choose to spend money buying fancy bibs, but at around £10 a pop, I decided to make my own version using scraps of Liberty fabric. I would like to add that I am a very poor sewer and can hardly sew a straight line – but hopefully the wearer won’t notice…

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  • Cardboard (I used an old shoe box)
  • A cheap bandana-style bib to use as reference (optional)
  • Tailor’s chalk
  • Scrap of fabric (use an old piece of clothing for example) for the front of the bib
  • A micro-fibre sport towel, like this
  • Scissors, needle and thread
  • Sewing machine
  • Press studs/poppers and fixing tool
  • Hammer

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1. First, use the cardboard to make a template. You can trace the cheap bib you have purchased especially for this task, or just copy the shape of mine and draw your own. It measures 24cm across at the widest part. Don’t forget to add at least a centimetre around the edge for your sewing margins.

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2. Use your template and tailor’s chalk to draw on your chosen fabric and micro-fibre towel. Make as many as you can in one go – think of it as mini bib factory!

3. Cut out each piece.

4. Place one pretty fabric piece and one micro-fibre piece right-side facing and pin together.

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5. Use your sewing machine to topstitch around the perimeter, leaving one short end open.

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6. Trim any rough edges around the sewn bib.

7. Pull the bib through the open edge, so the right side of the patterned fabric is facing out.

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8. You might want to iron the patterned fabric side to flatten it before you start hand-sewing the open edge of the bib. You need a little bit of folding so the raw edge of the fabric is not visible. Keep your stitches as small as possible.

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9. If you’re using press studs for the first time, check out this great tutorial on how to get it right. Position your press studs, hammer them into place and voilà!

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Photography: Emma Scott-Child
Bib modelled by the delicious Florence

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