THERE’S SOMETHING ABOUT SOCKS…

People are often obsessed with shoes and it is widely acknowledged that women are more so than men (although my father has the most pairs out of everyone I know).

Across cultures and for centuries, to have small, graceful feet has been a symbol of beauty for women. Cinderella didn’t just wear glass slippers; she had feet lovely enough to wear them without breaking them to pieces. The Chinese have spent centuries binding their rich girls’ feet to show off their status, as being wealthy meant you didn’t have to stand much to do any work (if they could only see us now!). And balancing on precarious high heels is a fashion that doesn’t seem to fade.

Your feet are your base, a pedestal for the sculpture of your body. So it is only natural that we pay attention to what envelops them. But while I understand why some of us spend a great deal of money on shoes, I really think we don’t invest enough on fine, cool socks.

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Forget the cheap, discoloured, holed pair from Tesco, which always seem to appear at the top of your underwear drawer when you are dressing up for an important occasion. Wearing really nice socks is like wearing beautiful lingerie, an almost secret act of personal attention that other people can only glimpse at. Something that instantly makes you feel cool even when you’ve got on your most comfortable jeans and a pair of desert boots.

So if after so many centuries we finally are our own ladies, free to do the job we want and marry for love (not because he’s got money and you’ve been put under a spell), then it’s time we stop spending our earnings only on glass shoes and turn our attention to soft socks too, like the Japanese do.

A handsome sock winking at you between a brogue and a rolled up chino turns something you put on just because it’s there into an elegant outfit – without effort and pain, or having your feet bound to your status, wealth or beauty.

Here are some socks and sockettes for queens, tsarinas and little princesses:

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Photography: Dee Ramadan
Styling: Margherita Poggiali

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